No War

“No war.” Says the sidewalk, the finger of some small town identity dragged through wet concrete. What? This is a small coastal town; this is a tourist town. What war? We aren’t at war, Thirroul has never been at war. We don’t even have a hospital to bomb. The only way we are going to get displaced is through the housing market. What war?

Who do you think you are talking to? Who do you think will wander past and see this? Who will look at this mark in the wet concrete? There are no military generals wandering around Thirroul, no PMs or anyone with any control on whether or not there are wars. What is your plan? You haven’t thought this through; you just defaced a sidewalk. What is wrong with you?

“No war”. Ugh.

What planet are you from?

But what if there is someone that needs to see that? Someone that needs to see that someone else in this small town is thinking this notion? Who am I to deprive them of that? There’s war somewhere. There’s always war somewhere, it’s like 5 ‘o’ clock. Maybe there should be a sidewalk with the words “No war” scrawled into it in every town. Like dots on the map.

Maybe this is what represents us, this declaration of what ought to be. Maybe it’s not the beach, or the sand, or the weather, or the people, or the stores, maybe it’s this one bit of sidewalk, just outside of town, maybe it’s this that represents us. It’s like being checked off a list.

Places that believe in wars:

1) Thirroul

2) Other places

And that’s one less place I suppose, one less place believing in destruction. One less place believing in little kids in the backs of ambulances. One less place believing in bombs. And that’s something.

The world is so full of despair. We live in a world where mustard gas exists. We learned about the Japanese POW camps in history the other day. Watched a documentary about the people who hold up the “god hates fags” signs on the sides of roads in English.

But someone in Thirroul believes in not wars, and this person decided to represent us on a sidewalk right outside of town. And maybe that’s how this works. Maybe it doesn’t start with riots, or posters, or speeches, maybe it starts with sidewalks.